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    • Entertainment News

      GreenbrierJournal

      This weekend, Downtown Lewisburg is set to come alive with the vibrant sounds of the Healing Appalachia event, featuring an exciting lineup of musicians and activities aimed at bringing the community together and celebrating the spirit of Appalachia.
      Saturday, July 13: Music and More
      The festivities kick off today at 1 PM with a stellar lineup of performances that will continue throughout the day until 8 PM. Headlining the event is the acclaimed singer-songwriter Nolan Taylor, known for his soulful voice and poignant lyrics that resonate deeply with listeners. Joining him on stage is Tommy Prine, bringing his own brand of heartfelt music that pays homage to his legendary father, John Prine, while carving out his unique sound.
      Rounding out the day's performances is Kindred Valley, a band that promises to deliver an energetic set filled with a blend of folk, rock, and Appalachian influences. The event promises an unforgettable experience for music lovers of all ages.
      In addition to the musical performances, attendees can explore various vendor booths, enjoy local food and drink offerings, and participate in family-friendly activities scattered throughout the downtown area. The atmosphere will be one of celebration and community, making it the perfect outing for families and friends.
      Sunday, July 14: Blues Brunch
      The festivities continue on Sunday with a special Blues Brunch featuring the John Inghram Band. Starting at 1 PM, the brunch will take place at the BrierGarten, offering a relaxing and soulful way to wrap up the weekend. The John Inghram Band is known for its captivating blues sound, and attendees can look forward to a mix of classic blues tunes and original compositions that will set the perfect tone for a laid-back Sunday afternoon.
      The Healing Appalachia event not only provides a platform for talented musicians but also supports a greater cause by raising awareness and funds for initiatives aimed at addressing the opioid crisis in the region. This event highlights the resilience and spirit of the Appalachian community, bringing people together through the universal language of music.
      Whether you're a local resident or visiting from out of town, this weekend's Healing Appalachia event is not to be missed. Come and discover the charm of Lewisburg, enjoy fantastic music, and be part of a meaningful cause. Join the celebration and help make a difference in the community.
      For more information about the event and updates, visit the official Healing Appalachia website or follow their social media channels.
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    • Education News

      GreenbrierJournal

      Dive into the rich tapestry of Appalachian burial customs and contribute to the preservation of history at the West Virginia Cemetery Documentation & Preservation Workshop. Scheduled for Saturday, July 13, 2024, this educational event is hosted at the historic Old Stone Presbyterian Church, located at 644 Church St, Lewisburg, WV.
      Funded partly by a grant from the West Virginia Humanities Council, the workshop is guided by Joni Morris, a dedicated 'Preserve WV AmeriCorps' member with the Preservation Alliance of West Virginia. The event aims to train participants in the intricate skills of identifying, documenting, cleaning, and repairing gravestones, increasing both public knowledge and the digital documentation of these historic sites.
      Morning Session: Classroom Learning
      From 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM, attendees will gather inside the Old Stone Presbyterian Church to delve into a comprehensive curriculum designed around cemetery preservation. The morning’s lessons will cover a range of topics, including the use of digital applications for cemetery documentation, understanding West Virginia's cemetery codes, and the preparation of inventory forms required by the WV State Historic Preservation Office. Additionally, participants will explore gravestone conservation techniques, deciphering stone iconography, and recognizing different stone types and styles.
      Lunch Break
      A lunch break from 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM will provide participants with an opportunity to discuss the morning's learning and network with fellow preservation enthusiasts. Lunch will be provided at the venue.
      Afternoon Session: Hands-On Fieldwork
      The hands-on segment of the workshop will run from 1:30 PM to 5:30 PM at the adjacent Lewisburg Cemetery. Participants will apply their newfound knowledge to real-world tasks such as digitally documenting gravestones, cleaning them with safe, provided materials like D2 Biological Cleaner, and learning techniques to level, reset, and repair gravestones.
      Preparation and Safety
      Participants are advised to wear closed-toe shoes or boots and comfortable clothing suitable for outdoor work. Work gloves are recommended, though nitrile gloves and cleaning supplies will be provided. Attendees should also consider bringing personal items such as bug spray, sunscreen, and hats to stay comfortable throughout the day.
      Registration and Contact Information
      Those interested in joining this vital preservation effort can contact Joni Morris for more details and registration at [email protected] or by calling 304-841-1510.
      Sponsorship
      This event is proudly sponsored by the Greenbrier Historical Society, which continues to support cultural preservation and educational initiatives across West Virginia.
      Join us in preserving West Virginia's legacy one stone at a time at this informative and enriching workshop.
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    • Local News

      GreenbrierJournal

      The annual Cruizin4Kidz Car Show is set to roll into the West Virginia State Fairgrounds on Saturday, July 13, offering a thrilling day for car enthusiasts and families alike. The event, which benefits the Children's Home Society, promises an exciting display of classic and custom vehicles, alongside a variety of family-friendly activities.
      Event Highlights:
      Time and Location: The car show will be held beside the Aquatic Center at the West Virginia State Fairgrounds. Early Bird Pricing: Registrations completed before July 1st cost $20. Participants can register by emailing [email protected] or contacting Cassandra Clinebell at 304-237-4243. Awards and Categories: The event features awards in several categories, including: Top 20 Best Ford Best Mopar Best Truck Best Import Best Bike Best of Show Best GM Best Jeep Best Little Model Kids Choice Best Little Tikes Best Unfinished Dash Plaques and Goodie Bags: The first 75 registered participants will receive dash plaques and goodie bags. In addition to the impressive car and bike displays, the event will host vendors and food trucks, ensuring a delightful experience for all attendees. Live music will add to the festive atmosphere, making it a perfect outing for families and automotive aficionados.
      The Cruizin4Kidz Car Show is not only a celebration of automotive excellence but also a heartfelt effort to support the Children's Home Society. The funds raised from the event will aid the society in its mission to provide care and support to children in need.
      Whether you're a car enthusiast looking to showcase your prized vehicle, a family searching for a fun weekend activity, or someone who wants to support a worthy cause, the Cruizin4Kidz Car Show promises an unforgettable day filled with community spirit and entertainment.
      Mark your calendars and drive down to the West Virginia State Fairgrounds on July 13 to join in the festivities and contribute to a noble cause.
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    • State News

      GreenbrierJournal

      Gov. Jim Justice, alongside the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources (WVDNR), announced today the opening of applications for an archery lottery deer hunt at Twin Falls Resort State Park. This unique opportunity will not only allow 15 hunters to experience the breathtaking wilderness of Twin Falls but also offer one grand prize winner a chance to hunt with the Whitetail Frenzy TV crew, featured on an episode of the popular hunting show.
      Applications Open July 15: Enter Here
      "I'm thrilled to announce this lottery hunt at Twin Falls and to be part of providing an unforgettable experience for one lucky hunter," Gov. Justice said. "With gorgeous scenery, abundant wildlife, and incredible opportunities like this, West Virginia continues to be the best place in the world to go hunting."
      The grand prize includes a special package with lodging at Twin Falls Resort, adding an extra layer of excitement and comfort for the winner.
      Promoting Wildlife Conservation and Sustainable Hunting
      "I want to thank Whitetail Frenzy for partnering with the WVDNR to offer this extraordinary opportunity," WVDNR Director Brett McMillion said. "This hunt not only highlights our state's natural beauty and abundant wildlife but also supports our efforts in promoting sustainable hunting practices and wildlife conservation."
      The lottery is open to both residents and non-residents, and applications must be submitted online at WVhunt.com. Hunters need to log into their existing Electronic Licensing and Game Checking System account or create one to apply. Once logged in, applicants can select “Enter a Lottery Drawing” and choose from the available options.
      State Park Controlled Deer Hunt Lotteries
      Gov. Justice and the WVDNR also announced dates and locations for controlled hunts at four state parks:
      Beech Fork State Park (Nov. 4–6 and Nov. 11–13) Bluestone State Park (Nov. 4–6) Cacapon Resort State Park (Nov. 6–8 and Nov. 13–15) Twin Falls Resort State Park (Nov. 4–6 and Nov. 11–13) Applications for these hunts will be available starting July 15 and must be submitted online at WVhunt.com by August 31. Hunters can apply for multiple hunts as individuals or as part of a group but can only enter each hunt once. There is a $15 application fee for each entry.
      Class N/NN Deer Hunt Lottery
      Applications to hunt in 12 limited permit areas during the 2024 antlerless deer season will also be available starting July 15. Hunters have until midnight on September 6 to apply. Locations for these hunts include:
      Camp Creek State Forest Greenbrier State Forest Hillcrest WMA National Forest Land (Pocahontas County) Public Land (Randolph County) Boone County Clay County (South Portion) Greenbrier County (North Portion) Kanawha County (North and South Portions) Nicholas County Webster County Hunters who receive a permit may hunt antlerless deer on private and public land in these areas on the following dates:
      Oct. 24-27 Nov. 25 to Dec. 8 Dec. 12-15 Dec. 28-31 West Virginia hunting regulations apply to all controlled hunts. All hunters aged 15 and older must have a valid West Virginia hunting license unless legally exempt from purchasing a license.
      Explore Greenbrier County
      Greenbrier County, home to the lush Greenbrier State Forest and numerous hunting opportunities, continues to be a prime destination for outdoor enthusiasts. From the rugged trails and serene landscapes to the welcoming communities, it embodies the spirit of West Virginia's rich natural heritage.
      To learn more about lottery hunts or to purchase a hunting license, visit WVDNR Lottery Hunts.
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    • Entertainment News

      GreenbrierJournal

      The Hunchback of Notre Dame, a collaborative production by Greenbrier Valley Theatre (GVT), Carnegie Hall, and Greenbrier Valley Chorale (GVC), will be presented on July 25, 26, and 27, at Carnegie Hall in Lewisburg, West Virginia. Costumes will play a big role in this production based on the Disney version and GVT Marketing Director Josh Lapping sat down to discuss costume design with Costume Designer Jenna Fawn Brown.
      Lapping: Can you tell us some history about how you got into professional costuming?
      Brown: Weirdly enough, with Halloween costumes. That’s how I got started, was with Halloween costumes, because I wanted to be an actor and so I learned to sew and I loved doing that, too. Then before I knew it I won one trophy, then another and another after that, and I thought ‘maybe there’s something to this.’ And I’ve been at GVT since September of 2009 – my first show was The Scottish Play.
      Lapping: This is a world where audience members come and appreciate costumes but rarely do, they really think about the work that goes into it – can you explain a little bit about the creative process that goes into designing and creating costumes?
      Brown: The process can be lengthy – we get our scripts for a season around January of February and the first thing you need to do is read the script. So that all starts in January and we’re producing Hunchback in July, so I’ve been working on this show since the beginning of the year. It takes months and months of work – for example today I am sketching up more deigns because I will be making these clothes. Sometimes its sitting at the computer and doing loads of research like how did they do it? or what do I think of this idea? or let’s look at what they historically would have worn’ and creating ideas by combining lots of images that I find either in my research books, on the internet and then I create Pintrest boards so that the director and I can communicate directly, even if they’re on the opposite coast. Then once the director and I speak, I’m able to form more solid ideas based on what they want and their needs are, along with what my wants and needs as an artist are. Then together we create a cohesive idea, together. All in all, it’s lots of script reading, lots of research, and lots of collaboration. 
      You also must keep the actors in mind – they have to wear this stuff. You don’t want to put them in something that’s going to make them horribly uncomfortable, if you can help it.
      Lapping: So, speaking specifically about Hunchback – it’s a show that so many will recognize because of the 1996 movie, so how do you go about creating something that is iconic and known, but also adding your own creative touch?
      Brown: This is where it can become a challenge, because we all do know what the Disney cartoon looks like. But the script for the stage production has a much darker look – it’s a slightly darker story, it’s a darker tale, believe it or not. So, where the Disney film did everything very bright with primary colors and secondary colors. We’re taking it into a darker world by darkening that color pallet in hue and tone and attempting to make it more realistic and more accessible to the audience. Audiences might be expecting the bright purple on Esmeralda, but we’ve decided to take it down a bit. It’s all about maintaining the integrity of the shape of the garments, maintaining the basic idea but then making them more grounded in truth and not just a bright, animated story.
      Lapping: What is specifically about Hunchback that you think it challenging and what is something that you’re excited about?
      Brown: There certainly is a challenge about bringing our reality to it and honoring it but not just making it the Disney cartoon. We want to create a three-dimensional world out of a two-dimensional world that was put on screen. It takes a special skill set to do that. I am actually very excited about Clopin, because he’s this wonderful character so I’m trying to create a cross between court jester-gypsy- and reality narrator. How do I go about that? I’m doing it through color, cut and attempting to make him look silly while also making him look serious. It’s a strange juxtaposition. One of the things that the director and I spoke about was Frollo. Frollo is an extremely interesting character – in the Disney film version he is all in black, he is painted dark from square one. But after speaking with the director, we were more interested in him being in white because he thinks he’s good. He puts out this, ‘I am a good ideologist’ even though his heart is very black. So, in order to facilitate this idea, I’m having him wear black robes under white ministerial robes. Again, we will have that juxtaposition – I am always for good juxtaposition. Light to dark - what is really underneath. So other times when I’ve done characters that were villains, but actually turned out to be heroes, I’ve put them in a blue undershirt with a black over-shirt – because underneath they’re true blue, but their outward character is dark. Layering colors to inform an audience’s brain, even if they don’t catch it, will inform audiences who characters are. It’s just so subtle, that you may not notice it until you notice it. That’s one of my favorite tricks to do. Color is so important to me and how color works in a story. When I’m teaching students about understanding costume design, I always refer to comic book characters. Think of Superman – what color does he wear? Blue. Blue is a hero color – 90% of the time your heroes will have some form of blue on. So yes, I love the subtly of color and how color can inform, even if it’s subconsciously, our minds to translate ‘good’, ‘bad’, ‘what’s your story’? So, in terms of Hunchback, the characters of Pheobus and Fredrick, the guardsmen for Frollo – they’re wearing blue. Because they’re really good guys, who are being forced to do something that they don’t want to do. In the case of Esmeralda, she has that deep purple in the film, which is one of my favorite colors to wear, but she also has a famous red dress. So, we’ve compromised the reds and purples to go with a pink- fuchsia and black look on her. So, she’ll still stick out as being Esmeralda without being just like the cartoon. It’s all about balancing things.
      Lapping: What do you want audiences to know just about you and the work that goes into costuming a show, that they may not already know?
      Brown: “It’s all about the hours and the passion. This is not a job that we take lightly. I got into this job because I absolutely adore making clothing and absolutely adore designing. It is the best feeling seeing a look on an actor’s face when they are happy with what they are wearing. I live for that look, and it is so special to me to get to do a job that doesn’t feel like a job. Is it work? Is it hard work? Absolutely. But it is absolutely valuable work. I help make people feel through clothing.”
      Lapping: Is there anything else you would like to share?
      Brown: The one thing I want to share is that the one thing that people get wrong about theatre and performing arts, is that it isn’t a real job. Without theatre and without arts, culture crumbles. Music, dance, art – even if you’re not the best at it – go and do it. Always be brave enough to do your art. You don’t need to be good at it, you just need to be brave enough to try and do it. That’s why this industry is so important.”
      Brown is a graduate of Florida State University with a Masters in Costume Design. She has been with GVT since 2009, and her credits there include Dracula: A Rock Opera, Macbeth, Nevermore, Romeo and Juliet, and The Crucible, to name a few. Prior to working with GVT, she worked for the Cumberland County Playhouse and the Clarence Brown Theatre, to name a few. A sampling of design credits includes: The Cherry Orchard, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, Little Women, Carousel, and Tartuffe, among others.
      Performances of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, featuring nationally recognized actors and professional choreography, costumes and lighting, will take place at Carnegie Hall on Thursday and Friday, July 25 and 26 at 7:30 p.m. There will be two performances on Saturday, July 27, at 3 p.m. and 8 p.m.  Tickets are available online at www.carnegiehallwv.org, or at the Carnegie Hall box office, 611 Church Street, Lewisburg, WV, (304) 645-7917.
      This FY25 Community Arts project is presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History, and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.
      Read more...

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    • Politics & Opinions

      GreenbrierJournal

      The Greenbrier County Republican Club convened for their regular July meeting with an agenda packed with updates, preparations, and community engagement. The meeting was led by the club's Vice President, Douglas McKinney, as President Gordon Campbell was out of town.
      Invocation and Pledge
      Brent Thompson gave the invocation, focusing on gratitude and prayers for a fair and honest election in November. He also prayed for the success of the club's state fair booth and for the ongoing revival and awakening movements. The invocation set a solemn tone for the meeting, emphasizing the club's commitment to community and country. Following this, Vietnam veteran Ponce Pollard led the Pledge of Allegiance.
      Agenda Approval and Minutes
      The agenda was swiftly approved without any additions or changes. Vice President McKinney acknowledged some disruptions in recent meetings and noted that while minutes were recorded, they had not been sent out. The minutes were deemed unremarkable, with no significant issues to report.
      Treasurer's Report
      The treasurer reported a current account balance of $10,053.82, with recent expenses including $175 for an advertisement at the Alderson Fourth of July Festival and $350 for state fair booth admissions tickets. The club remains in a strong financial position with all bills paid and preparations for the state fair booth well underway.
      Introduction of Guests
      The meeting welcomed several notable guests, including interim County Commissioner Nick Dailey and candidates for the County Commission, Richie Holliday and Tammy Tentscher. Commissioner Lowell Rose was also in attendance. The presence of these officials underscored the club's active involvement in local governance and elections.
      State Fair Booth
      Brent Thompson, chairing the state fair booth again this year, outlined the booth's schedule from August 8 to 17. He encouraged members to engage with fairgoers and discuss issues openly. The booth will feature Trump memorabilia, club brochures, and opportunities for voter registration. Volunteers will be provided with admission tickets and necessary materials to ensure a successful outreach effort.
      Candidate Presentations
      Tammy Tentscher
      Tammy Tentscher, running unopposed for re-election to the County Commission, highlighted her extensive involvement in county projects. These include a $25 million water infrastructure project, a $12 million broadband initiative, and ongoing work on the Meadow River Trail. She emphasized the importance of financial stewardship and the county's conservative spending approach.
      Richie Holliday
      Richie Holliday, appointed to the ballot to fill a vacancy, shared his background and vision for the county. A business owner and former town councilman in Peterstown, Holliday stressed the need for effective budgeting and constituent engagement. He also addressed pressing issues like traffic problems and the need for a sports facility in the county.
      Discussion on the Sportsplex and Other Projects
      Commissioner Lowell Rose and Richie Holliday discussed the long-awaited sportsplex project, citing funding challenges and the need for phased development. Rose provided updates on the bypass project and comprehensive plan, emphasizing the county's proactive approach to infrastructure and zoning.
      Legislative Concerns
      Ray Canterbury, candidate for the House of Delegates, addressed the club on the state's financial risks, particularly its significant debt load and the management of pension funds. He stressed the importance of legislative oversight and the need to mitigate financial risks to protect taxpayers and pensioners.
      Fundraising and Membership
      The meeting also featured a fundraising proposal by Steve Hart, who plans to auction historical and political memorabilia to support the club. The event, scheduled for September 5, aims to boost membership and raise funds for future initiatives.
      Closing
      The meeting concluded with a heartfelt rendition of "God Bless America" led by Ron Kirk in celebration of his birthday, fostering a sense of unity and patriotism among the attendees.
      The Greenbrier County Republican Club continues to engage actively in local politics, supporting candidates, addressing community issues, and preparing for upcoming events, all while maintaining a strong financial footing and a clear vision for the future.
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    • Government News

      GreenbrierJournal

      The Town of Rupert has issued a public notice inviting sealed bids for the sale of a utility vehicle. The equipment, a 2016 Yamaha Wolverine 700 RSPEC, is available for inspection and will be sold "as is."
      Vehicle Details:
      Model: 2016 Yamaha Wolverine 700 RSPEC Hours: 361.6 Mileage: 2652 miles Features: New tires, snowplow, winch Condition: Requires engine work Inspection Details: Interested parties can inspect the vehicle at the Rupert Water Plant located at 251 Cranberry Ave, Rupert, WV. The inspection hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
      Bid Submission: Sealed bids must be submitted to the Town of Rupert by 4:00 p.m., EST on Wednesday, July 24, 2024. Bids can be mailed or delivered to:
      Town of Rupert P.O. Drawer B 528 Nicholas Street Rupert, WV 25984
      Important Information:
      Bids received after the deadline will not be considered. All bids will be opened after the deadline. The Town of Rupert reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids. The winning bid must be paid in full within seven (7) days of bid closing. The equipment and/or titles, if applicable, will be released upon full payment. For further details or inquiries, interested bidders can contact the Town of Rupert directly.
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    • Government News

      GreenbrierJournal

      On Tuesday, July 9th, the Greenbrier County Commission held its regular meeting at the Greenbrier County Courthouse. The meeting began with an invocation led by Commissioner Daily and the Pledge of Allegiance led by Cindy.
      The meeting officially commenced with the approval of the minutes from the previous meeting held on June 25, 2024. Commissioner Daily moved to approve the minutes, which was seconded and passed unanimously.
      Key Agenda Items:
      Settlements of Estates:
      Cindy Allen, the Fiduciary Supervisor, presented final settlement reports for estates. The Commission approved the settlements unanimously.
      Exonerations and County Splits:
      Three consolidations from the Assessor's Office were reviewed and approved. Additionally, exonerations and county splits were considered and approved without any objections.
      Financial Approvals:
      Robin Lauterman presented financial transfers for various county projects:
      Arts and Recreation Transfer: $567.30 for the 2023-24 programming, $1,219.92 for pickleball equipment, and $14,000 for mowing services for the Meadow River Trail, totaling $15,787.27. This transfer was approved. Budget Revisions: Several budget revisions were proposed, including increases for contingency, building maintenance, and law enforcement overtime. All revisions were approved unanimously. New Business:
      Bid Openings for FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grant Program: A bid was opened for the residential elevation grant program for a property at 169 John Perry Lane in Fort Springs, damaged in the 2016 flood. The sole bid received will be reviewed by Paula Brown to ensure compliance before final consideration.
      Grant Approval: The Commission considered and approved the grant agreement and resolution for the 2024-2025 Department of Justice and Community Services community corrections grant totaling $270,000. This grant supports the community corrections program with quarterly payments of $67,500.
      Conclusion
      The meeting concluded with all agenda items addressed. The Commissioners wished everyone a good 4th of July and adjourned the meeting at 10:18 AM.
      For more information and detailed minutes, visit the Greenbrier County Commission's official website.

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    • Government News

      GreenbrierJournal

      The West Virginia Department of Human Services (DoHS), Bureau for Behavioral Health (BBH) today announced the completion of the first comprehensive study of homelessness in the state. The pivotal study sheds light on the complexities and diverse nature of the population experiencing homelessness in West Virginia. Key findings from the study reveal the following:
      Diverse Demographics: The study indicates that 58% of individuals experiencing homelessness self-identified as male. Additionally, 13% self-identified as Black or African American, a figure notably higher than the 3.7% of the total West Virginia population identifying as Black or African American, as reported by the 2020 U.S. Census.
      Age Distribution: Nearly half (48%) of those experiencing homelessness were between the ages of 25 to 44. 
      Complex Drivers: Substance use disorder (SUD) and mental illness were identified as significant drivers of homelessness. However, the experiences leading to homelessness were multifaceted, with individuals often facing a combination of challenges such as being released from correctional facilities, lack of affordable housing, and unemployment. 
      Geographical Trends: The majority of individuals experiencing homelessness were found in population centers, which also host most of the services aimed at assisting this population.
      Origins and Mobility: While the majority of individuals experiencing homelessness were long-term residents of West Virginia, many cited the availability of services, proximity to family, and personal relationships as reasons for relocating to or within West Virginia.
      “This study provides valuable insights into the multifaceted nature of homelessness in our state,” said Christina Mullins, DoHS Deputy Secretary of Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders. “It underscores the significant role that mental health and substance use disorders play in this crisis. With this information, we are better equipped to develop comprehensive, compassionate, and effective strategies to support our most vulnerable residents.”
      For more information on homeless services in West Virginia, visit dhhr.wv.gov/bfa/communityresources/Pages/Homeless-Services.aspx. 
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    • Local News

      As Independence Day celebrations light up the night skies, fireworks safety becomes paramount to ensure a joyous and accident-free holiday. One crucial aspect of fireworks safety often overlooked is the proper disposal of used fireworks. To prevent potential hazards, it is recommended to soak used fireworks in a bucket of water before discarding them. Here’s why and how to do it effectively:
      The Importance of Proper Disposal
      Fireworks, after their dazzling displays, can remain hot and potentially hazardous. If not disposed of correctly, they can cause fires or injuries. Embers and unburned components within used fireworks can reignite even after the initial explosion, leading to unexpected dangers.
      Step-by-Step Guide to Safe Disposal
      Preparation: Before lighting fireworks, have a bucket of water ready and positioned in a safe area away from the firing zone. Ensure the bucket is large enough to fully submerge the used fireworks.
      Immediate Action: Once the fireworks have finished their display, allow them a few minutes to cool down. This helps avoid any immediate risks of burns or accidental ignition.
      Soaking: Submerge the used fireworks completely in the bucket of water. Let them soak for at least 15-20 minutes. This ensures that any remaining embers or unburned materials are fully extinguished.
      Handling with Care: After soaking, carefully remove the fireworks from the water. Ensure they are thoroughly saturated and no longer pose any fire risk.
      Disposal: Place the soaked fireworks in a plastic bag and seal it securely. Dispose of the bag in your regular household trash. This extra precaution prevents any accidental contact with dry materials that could reignite a fire.
      Additional Safety Tips
      Monitor the Area: Keep a watchful eye on the area where fireworks are being used. Ensure children and pets are kept at a safe distance. Follow Instructions: Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for both the use and disposal of fireworks. Stay Informed: Be aware of local regulations and guidelines regarding fireworks use and disposal. By following these simple yet effective steps, you can help ensure that your fireworks celebrations remain safe and enjoyable for everyone. Proper disposal not only prevents accidents but also contributes to a cleaner and safer environment.
      For more information on fireworks safety and regulations, visit [Local Fire Department Website] or contact your local fire safety office. Stay safe and have a fantastic Fourth of July!
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