Jump to content
  • Greenbrier Journal

    Welcome to the Greenbrier Journal. We are a news publishing business located right here in Greenbrier County, West Virginia. Our mission is simple: to cover local news and politics. Signing up is completely FREE, so get started today.

  • News

    Greenbrier Journal News Articles
    • State News

      GreenbrierJournal

      State Police - Elkins has issued a Silver Alert for David G. Sharpes of Marlinton, 74 years old, 5'08" tall, 210 lbs, brown eyes, grey hair, and walks with a cane. Last seen around 5PM on 02/25/2025 - traveling on foot on Rt 28, Browns Creek Rd. Heading south towards Huntersville. Last seen wearing a faded blue denim jacket, grey pants.
      Read more...

      0 • 0

    • Local News

      GreenbrierJournal

      Lewisburg Elementary School is eagerly anticipating the arrival of their newest staff member, Pixie, a female Labradoodle who will serve as a therapy dog starting mid-March. Pixie's addition to the school comes as part of the statewide initiative, Friends With Paws, spearheaded by Governor Justice and First Lady Cathy Justice.
      With the announcement of the next six therapy dogs to be placed in schools across West Virginia, Lewisburg Elementary is gearing up to welcome Pixie into their community. The Friends With Paws program aims to provide companionship and support to students facing various challenges, offering them a furry friend to turn to during times of need.
      Pixie will join a team of dedicated educators and staff at Lewisburg Elementary who are committed to the well-being of their students. Research has shown that therapy dogs can have a positive impact on students' mental health, reducing anxiety and stress while promoting a sense of calm and security.
      In addition to providing emotional support, Pixie will participate in various activities designed to promote student engagement and well-being. From reading sessions to outdoor playtime, Pixie will be an active member of the school community, fostering connections and spreading joy wherever she goes.
      As Lewisburg Elementary eagerly awaits Pixie's arrival, the entire school is buzzing with anticipation. Students, teachers, and parents alike are looking forward to welcoming their newest furry friend and experiencing the positive impact she will undoubtedly have on their school.
      Stay tuned for updates as Lewisburg Elementary prepares to roll out the red carpet for Pixie, their newest four-legged staff member, in mid-March.
      Read more...

      100 • 0

    • Education News

      GreenbrierJournal

      Carnegie Hall staff and key volunteers are now up to date on CPR
      (cardiopulmonary resuscitation), AED (Automated External Defibrillators), and First Aid after attending a
      Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED training and certification on January 30.
      Charleston Area Medical Center (CAMC) Greenbrier Valley Medical Center donated an AED unit and
      provided training by instructors Diana Russell, Clinical Education Manager, and Melissa Johnson, Nursing
      Education Specialist. 
      “We at Carnegie and grateful for the donation of the AED unit as an additional opportunity it ensures
      the best for our patrons,” states Carnegie Hall CEO/President Cathy Rennard. “It was important to us to
      invest the time in CPR training, use of the AED unit, and certifying the entire staff in First Aid.”
      Rebecca J Harless, MBA, Vice President of CAMC Greenbrier Valley Medical Center, adds that “This
      contribution underscores our hospital's unwavering commitment to connecting with and serving the
      community since CAMC acquired Greenbrier Valley Medical Center. We believe that access to life-saving
      equipment like AEDs is essential for ensuring the well-being and safety of everyone in our community.
      This donation is just one example of how we strive to make a positive impact and foster a healthier,
      safer environment for all.”
      Participants receiving certification included Becky Mahlburg, Sally Bray, Cathy Rennard, Philip
      McLaughlin, Teri Hartford, Barbara Walker, Butch Hickman, Harmony Flora, Sheila Hutchinson, Jill
      McClung, Kit Lindsey, Michael Kincaid, and John Arnold.
      For more information, please visit carnegiehallwv.org, call (304) 645-7917, or stop by the Hall at 611
      Church Street, Lewisburg, WV.
      Carnegie Hall WV is a member-driven nonprofit organization supported by individual contributions,
      grants, and fundraising efforts such as TOOT and The Carnegie Hall Gala.
      Carnegie Hall programs are presented with financial assistance through a grant from the West Virginia
      Department of Arts, Culture and History and the National Endowment for the Arts, with approval from
      the West Virginia Commission on the Arts.
      Read more...

      27 • 0

    • Education News

      GreenbrierJournal

      Carnegie Hall’s Class & Workshop Series presents a special lecture and demo by the Rhythm of the Dance dancers before their performance on Sunday, March 3, at 12:30 p.m. in the Old Stone Room (located on the ground floor). The class is free, but attendees must register.
      The workshop will be an informative afternoon of exploring the world of historic Irish Dance. Dancers and community members of all ages will have a rare opportunity to meet with the performing artists and learn firsthand about Ireland’s cultural heritage of music and dance.
      Rated as the most popular Irish Dance production touring the world, Rhythm of the Dance celebrates all elements of Irish culture with champion step dancers and innovative choreography, first rate Irish musicians and singers, and storytelling that is centuries old.
      “Our part of West Virginia is steeped in Scots Irish culture, history, and descendants and we often receive requests for music and dance of this genre because of the connection,” explains Kit Lindsey, Carnegie Hall Development Manager. “Seldom in rural Appalachia does a community have the opportunity to engage in an international ensemble of this caliber.”
      To register for the free lecture and demonstration or to purchase tickets for the Rhythm of the Dance Mainstage Performance please visit carnegiehallwv.org, call 304.645.7917, or stop by 611 Church Street, Lewisburg, WV.
      This program is supported by a Special Presenters Initiative Grant from the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation.
      Read more...

      33 • 0

    • Entertainment News

      GreenbrierJournal

      Carnegie Hall presents a special performance of bluegrass group on Friday, March
      15, at 7 p.m. Guests are invited to come early to Club Carnegie from 6 – 6:45 p.m. in the Board Room located
      adjacent to the Hamilton Auditorium. A cash bar and snacks will be available.
      The Legends of WV Bluegrass is a collection of the best Bluegrass musicians from West Virginia. Each of these
      musicians have performed with the elite in the Bluegrass industry. The group includes Buddy Griffin, David
      O'Dell, Jackie Kincaid, and Roger Hoard, and each member has over 50 years of experience.
      The Carnegie Hall performance will feature a bass built by local resident and luthier John Preston being played
      for the first time in public by David O’Dell.
      Buddy Griffin was born into a musical family in Richwood, WV, and was influenced by the songs of the original
      Carter Family. His talented family part-time band were regulars on several radio and TV shows in West Virginia
      and Virginia. They played on the Red Smiley Show in Oak Hill, the Buddy Starcher Show in Charleston, and the
      Top O’ The Morning Show in Roanoke VA.
      Buddy was a multi-instrumentalist, first taking up the 5-string banjo, but eventually became best known for his
      talent on the fiddle. His fiddle got him a full-time job with the Wheeling Jamboree and performing with the
      regulars on WWVA such as the Heckels.
      During his professional career Buddy has played, recorded, and traveled with the biggest stars in bluegrass
      music such as Johnny Russell, the Goins Brothers, Josh Graves, Mac Wiseman, Dave Evans, Jim and Jesse
      McReynolds and the Virginia Boys, Bobby Osborne, Christy Lane and Albert Brumley, Jr, Doug Dillard Band as
      well as many others.
      Buddy has played at the Grand Ole Opry numerous times, Wheeling Jamboree, Ozark Mountain Hoedown,
      Mountain Stage, Gold Coast Casino, in Las Vegas plus many other venues and bluegrass festivals nationwide.
      In addition to his music, Buddy was an educator who graduated from Glenville State College and taught school in
      Braxton and Nicholas Counties. His most notable achievement in music and education was creating and leading
      the Bluegrass Four Year Degree program at Glenville State College. The first person to complete the program
      was Lizzy Long of Little Roy and Lizzy.
      During his professional career Buddy has received many awards. Most notable was his induction into the WV
      Music Hall of Fame in 2023, the Vandalia Award, an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts from Glenville State College
      and the winner of the WV State banjo and fiddle contest.
      Joining Buddy on stage is bassist David O’Dell. He was born and raised in Spencer, WV, and began playing banjo
      at age 14, learning clawhammer style banjo for traditional music under the influence of Frank George. He soon
      became a familiar face at West Virginia’s music festivals such as the Vandalia Gathering and the West Virginia
      State Folk Festival, where he won the old-time banjo contests numerous times. After high school he continued
      to focus on traditional music, but also began branching out into other instruments such as fiddle, dulcimer,
      guitar, and bass, as well as other musical styles such as bluegrass.
      After several years in Kentucky and Tennessee, David moved back to West Virginia in 1996 and became involved
      in the music scene more than ever. He was invited to be on the Board of Directors of the West Virginia State
      Folk Festival, and he also became more involved in recording and producing recordings of West Virginia
      musicians.
      David’s versatility as a musician landed him several gigs as a substitute band member when regular members
      weren’t available for certain gigs. He often sat in with The Samples Brothers playing fiddle, banjo, or bass
      depending upon what was needed at the time. He also filled in as a bass player for Retro and Smiling, a Reno
      and Smiley tribute band featuring Buddy Griffin and Ashley Messenger. He now regularly plays banjo in the
      Mack Samples Band, as well as in the duo The MacAbreBrothers with Pete Kosky.
      In addition to playing music, David has also taught several workshops on banjo, fiddle, and mountain dulcimer at
      places such as the Augusta Heritage Center, Allegheny Echoes, and the Cedar Lakes Craft Center. He has hosted
      a weekly radio show on WOTR in Weston, West Virginia, and played venues as far away as Ireland and Australia.
      He now plays music mostly whenever it’s convenient, leaving time for his day job as Professor of Chemistry and
      Chair of the Science and Mathematics Department at Glenville State University as well as for spending time with
      his family.
      On the mandolin will be Jackie Kincaid who was born into a musical family in Meadow Bridge, WV. His father
      had a bluegrass band and Jackie learned to play the Mandolin at an early age. His talent soon became
      recognized, and he was offered jobs playing for other bluegrass bands. His skill on the mandolin and clear tenor
      voice has led him to perform professionally at the Wheeling Jamboree, The Grand Ole Opry, Bill Gaither’s
      Videos, RFD-TV, the World’s Fair and many other venues across the United States.
      Jackie has been a sought-after vocalist and musician and has performed with the Larry Sparks band for many
      years. He has also performed with Bobby Osborne, Jesse McReynolds, Curley Seckler, Alison Krauss, Judy
      Marshall, Dave Evans, Uncle Josh Graves, and many of the top bluegrass artists. He continues to write songs and
      perform in and around the Nashville area.
      Jackie states “I have accomplished more than I could ever thought possible in Bluegrass music, and it all began in
      the mountains of WV. While I live in Nashville now, WV will always be my home.
      Rounding out the group on guitar is Roger Hoard from Sutton, WV. At a young age he moved to the Wheeling
      area. Currently, he resides in St. Claresville, OH where he manages a music store along with performing
      regularly. He was instrumental in helping many talented musicians in WV get their start professionally.
      Roger is one of the most recognizable and respected talents on guitar anywhere, was one of Dan Jones’ early
      mentors in music. In addition, he has helped train some of the Ohio-Valley’s greatest musicians including the
      one and only Brad Paisley. Hoard has been associated with Jamboree USA, Jamboree in the Hills, and directed some of the Ohio Valley’s greatest bands such as Country Roads, The Other Brothers, 11/70, and The Fabulous Bender Boys.
      Tickets are $25/adults and $10/students. Discounts are available for Carnegie Hall members, senior citizens, and
      military. To purchase tickets, call Carnegie Hall Box Office at 304.645.7917, visit www.carnegiehallwv.org, or
      stop by at 611 Church Street, Lewisburg, West Virginia. Carnegie Hall Box Office is open Monday through Friday,
      10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
      Carnegie Hall WV is a member-driven nonprofit organization supported by individual contributions, grants, and
      fundraising efforts such as TOOT and The Carnegie Hall Gala. The Hall is located at 611 Church Street, Lewisburg,
      WV. For more information, please call 304.645.7917 or visit www.carnegiehallwv.org.
      Read more...

      650 • 0

    • Entertainment News

      GreenbrierJournal

      Carnegie Hall, working in partnership with Greenbrier County music and
      theatre educators, presents One Night Only: A Celebration of Young Musicians in the Greenbrier Valley
      on Thursday, March 7, at 7 p.m. The concert is a performance opportunity for accomplished music
      students in grades 6-12 living or taking lessons in the Greenbrier Valley. The showcase takes place in
      Carnegie Hall’s Hamilton Auditorium Stage and is sponsored by Charleston Area Medical Center (CAMC).
      The One Night Only Showcase will feature over 45 students who were juried in by video entries for solo
      performers and ensembles. Carnegie Hall received over 40 submissions, with the top 25 being selected.
      Video entries included everything from solo piano performers and vocalists to horn players and full rock
      bands.
      “The Greenbrier Valley is home to such an array of talented kids and Carnegie Hall is thrilled to give
      them an opportunity to be in the limelight,” exclaims Kit Lindsey, Carnegie Hall Development Manager.
      She adds, “we hope to be able to continue this event and give as many students performing
      opportunities in the future.”
      Selected performers include Aubrey Adkins, Joshua Alley, Ella Butler, Theo Crowell, Lily Dense, Ezra Dick,
      Tad Elkins, Kylee Fury, Keean Hedrick, Alexus Hill, Mason Huffman, Lydia Jackson, Mary Johnson, Sasha
      Lanek, Lucia Lipton, Lillian Long, Sal Marks, Ashley Meadows, Isaac Tincher, Wyatt Thornton, Coleton
      Utterback, Alyson Vandall, Emma Vincent, Nathaniel Vincent, Arabella Webb, The Shattered Glass
      (Second Block Rock Group), Enceladus Quartet (Heartstrings Academy), and The Arrivals (Second Block
      Rock Group).
      One Night Only will also be assisted by student stage/tech crew members, Kimmi Butler and Preston
      Hedrick, and a student Emcee, Teagan Mandeville.
      Special thanks to: Susan Adkins, Sally Bray, CAMC, Bill Clapham, Harmony Flora, Birch Graves, Gibbs
      Kinderman, Mary Leb, Kit Lindsey, Cathy Rennard, Susanna Robinson, Cathy Sawyer, David Webb, Nancy
      Wood, and all Greenbrier County music instructors and classroom teachers that encouraged students to
      participate.
      Read more...

      260 • 0

    • State News

      GreenbrierJournal

      Since Gov. Jim Justice and the West Virginia Division of Highways (WVDOH) announced Operation R.I.P. Potholes on Tuesday, January 30, 2024, WVDOH road crews have patched 17,047 potholes along 3,474 miles of road. Justice and the WVDOH have been taking advantage of unseasonably warm weather to get a head start on the spring pothole patching season.   Asphalt plants in Poca, Princeton, and Morgantown remain open the week of Monday, February 19, 2024, allowing the WVDOH to make permanent pothole repairs with hot asphalt.   Roads scheduled to be milled and filled on Wednesday, February 21, 2024, include:   WV 85 and Riverside Road, Boone County. WV 4, Clay County. US 119, WV 817, WV 622, WV 61, and Indian Creek Road, Kanawha County. Jerry’s Run Road and Poindexter Road, Mason County. WV 817 and WV 62, Putnam County. US 60 and Weavers Road, Cabell County. Buffalo Calf Road and Salem Long Run Road, Doddridge County. Interstate 79, WV 131, and Marshville Road, Harrison County. WV 218, Little Mill Fall Road, and Paw Paw Creek Road, Marion County. US 119 and WV 7, Monongalia County. WV 72 and WV 24, Preston County. Berry Run and Buck Run Road, Taylor County. WV 16, Fayette County. WV 12, Greenbrier County. WV 122 and WV 12, Monroe County. WV 20, Summers County. WV 83, McDowell County. Red Sulphur Turnpike, Mercer County. Oakwood Avenue, Raleigh County.   As Operation R.I.P Potholes continues, the DOT will keep the public informed through regular press announcements.
      Read more...

      92 • 0

    • Politics & Opinions

      GreenbrierJournal

      As we have seen over the past few months in Jefferson County, there are significant issues with West
      Virginia State Code 3-10-7, article 10 as it pertains to filling vacancies on a county commission. Not
      only is the current code written for 3-person county commissions, but it removes the residents of the
      county from participating in the process of selecting someone to represent them. Jefferson County is
      not alone. Other counties in recent years, such as Mingo and Cabell Counties, have had to fill
      vacancies in commission seats to a mixed public reception.
      I strongly believe if we are going to amend the code, we should do it in a way that returns the power
      to the people and permits the people to ‘elect’ their representatives, even for vacant seats. I also
      believe that a small group of people on a county commission or county political executive committee
      should not have the power to appoint someone to fill a vacant seat; the people should always be part
      of the process.
      To address these issues, I have collaborated with Delegate Henry Dillon to submit a bill that will
      overhaul how vacant county commission seats are filled by returning the power to the people. Thank
      you, Delegate Dillon, for listening to the people and supporting this bill.
      House Bill 5440 states that:
      All vacancies on a county commission are to be filled by special election. The Special Election shall have a 30-day filing period followed by 60 days for campaigning. Voting for the special election shall be conducted at the county courthouse in which the vacancy occurs, and voting shall be available for five consecutive, regular business days during normal business hours. A special election will not be held if the notice of vacancy occurs within 90 days of a primary or general election. The person who is elected during the special election shall complete the entire remainder of the term of the vacant position. To qualify to run for special election a person must be a member of the same political party as the vacant seat during the last election cycle and must legally reside in the magisterial district of the vacant seat. I pray that citizens in all counties never experience the disenfranchisement that occurred in Jefferson
      County with an appointment that allowed existing commissioners to consolidate power apart from
      the will of the people. We must learn from our mistakes and lead with change that makes sense and
      work together toward amending code to address current situations for the greater good of all people,
      not just a few.
      House Bill 5440 is currently with the House Judiciary Committee. I am calling on my fellow
      commissioners to join me in supporting HB 5440 and to contact your delegate and encourage them to
      support this bill as well.
      House Bill 5440: https://www.wvlegislature.gov/Bill_Text_HTML/2024_SESSIONS/RS/bills/hb5440 intr.pdf
       
      Read more...

      196 • 0

    • Government News

      GreenbrierJournal

      The Greenbrier County Commission convened for its regular session, confronting pivotal issues including a contentious property dispute and logistical adjustments for the upcoming primary election amidst renovations to the historic Greenbrier County Courthouse.
      The commission grappled with a familial dispute over the estate of, a longtime resident of Greenbrier County. Brothers Daniel and Michael, fraternal twins, found themselves at odds regarding the fate of their family home. Fiduciary Commissioner Shear presented exhaustive recommendations following meticulous investigations and consultations with the involved parties.
      Commissioner Shear's recommendations, accepted by the commission, advocate for an amicable resolution between the siblings regarding the property's ownership. Should a consensus prove elusive, the property may be subject to sale, with equitable distribution of proceeds among the brothers.
      With renovations underway at the esteemed Greenbrier County Courthouse, the commission approved alternative locations for early voting during the 2024 primary election. The Romano Law Office annex and the Rupert Community Building were designated as primary early voting sites, ensuring accessibility and convenience for voters amidst the courthouse renovations.
      In a bid to rejuvenate the local landscape, the commission greenlit a grant of $572,000 from the Division of Environmental Protection. This funding will facilitate the demolition of derelict and abandoned properties scattered throughout Greenbrier County, enhancing community aesthetics and safety.
      Furthermore, the commission deliberated on the transfer of a portion of property to the Greenbrier Valley Economic Development Corporation, valued at approximately $150,000. This strategic transfer aims to catalyze economic development endeavors within the county, fostering growth and prosperity for residents.
      As the meeting concluded, the Greenbrier County Commission reiterated its unwavering commitment to serving the best interests of the community. By fostering transparency, collaboration, and pragmatic solutions, the commission remains steadfast in its mission to navigate complex challenges and propel Greenbrier County toward a prosperous future.
      The courthouse renovations serve as a symbol of ongoing progress and revitalization within Greenbrier County, reflecting the community's resilience and determination in overcoming obstacles and embracing positive change.

      Read more...

      298 • 0

    • Local News

      GreenbrierJournal

      Residents and travelers in Greenbrier County are advised of upcoming road closures on County Route 43, Fort Spring Pike, due to essential repairs on the Fort Spring Bridge. Beginning Monday, February 26, 2024, through Friday, March 1, 2024, the bridge will be closed to through traffic from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. daily.
      While the closure is in effect, alternative routes are recommended for all non-local traffic to navigate around the work area. However, it's important to note that the school bus schedule will remain unaffected during this period. Local traffic will still have access to all properties on both sides of the bridge.
      The West Virginia Department of Highways (WVDOH) extends their apologies for any inconvenience caused by this necessary maintenance. They emphasize the importance of adhering to all traffic control signs and devices and exercising caution while traveling near the work zone.
      It's acknowledged that unforeseen circumstances or inclement weather may potentially impact the project schedule, but not the closure time. WVDOH reassures the public that every effort will be made to complete the repairs promptly and efficiently.
      For the duration of the closure, motorists are encouraged to plan their journeys accordingly and allow for extra travel time as needed. By observing posted detours and exercising caution, everyone can contribute to ensuring a safe and smooth traffic flow during this period of maintenance.
      For further updates or inquiries regarding the Fort Spring Bridge repairs, residents and travelers are advised to stay tuned to local news sources or contact the Greenbrier County Homeland Security & Emergency Management.
      In conclusion, while inconvenience may arise from the temporary closure of Route 43, these essential repairs are crucial for maintaining the safety and integrity of the Fort Spring Bridge. Your cooperation and understanding during this time are greatly appreciated.
      Read more...

      292 • 0



×
×
  • Create New...